Infinite Complexity to Social Networking (Facebook Changes)

Facebook gave all their users a good heads up on the news they would update their networking site, but people really didn’t know what to expect till the changes became reality. For better or worse, the changes were basically permanent and immediate. All users now share the same look, functionality, and usage. Now, the truth is, Facebook did this for our own good. Based on very good research, surveys, testing, and programming, Facebook has once again given us a giant leap for all socializing kind. But do we appreciate it?

Not really, by the looks of it. Users on the web must hate change. Whether a good change, or not, Facebook and most other social network sites aren’t the easiest sites to use. On the one hand, they should be easy and you’d think that they would be. On the other, you realize that Facebook does so much, and with all those features with practical—and unpractical—applications you can use the site, user friendliness has got to give.

I personally like all the change. Facebook is finally getting to where I wanted it back at the start. If you’ll just give it a week or two, and you look at the excellent features and control you have for quick, punchy, applications of you page and keeping up with friends, I think you see that the upgrade was like going from a V4 to a V6 engine.

And at what cost? “Cost?” you ask. Yes, these changes cost someone something, and believe me—I work on the web for a living—these changes aren’t easy to make or cheap. So who’s paying for it? Well, ultimately advertisers. Bust there has been discussion abroad about social networking sites establishing pay-for membership of their sites. Would you want that to happen to your Facebook? Thank God the Facebook team hasn’t seriously considered this as a viable option. And thank God that they likely won’t in the future.

I bring that up because if you’re not paying for it than you are not entitled to it. Facebook’s mere existence is at other’s expense. You get it free and clear. You can use it as much or little as you like without having to work for it or donate to the cause. This is a remarkable service and not to be overlooked. I don’t think I should ever seriously grumble about the site or technology in it if I don’t pay for it. Not to say I wouldn’t drop a recommendation, comment, or complaint to the Facebook team if I thought it would be beneficial to them. By all means, web developers thrive off users input.

Just don’t make it difficult for them to cut through all the whiny and pointless complaints, please? If you have something constructive to argue against the changes, or if you think you’ve got a good idea for another change, go to the proper department of Facebook and let them know.

Those are my thoughts. Just give it a couple weeks, and you’ll see that the little effort you put into adjustment will pay off.

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